Gallery 2 -  Traditional Roosting Places

        Gallery 1 - Some of the Bats living in Surrey
       
Gallery 3 - Artificial Roosting Places
        Gallery 4 - Surrey Bat Group at Work

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Barn1.jpg (60950 bytes)

 

Old timber barns are favourite roost sites,  where split timbers and gaping joints provide snug crevices
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

 
   

Caves and fissures in calciferous rocks can provide the consistent temperature and humidity levels needed by many species
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

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Disused mines also provide a safe refuge with consistent conditions
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

 
  In popular imagination, the most typical location for roosting bats - though unlikely to be in the belfry with all that noise and vibration
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
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Domestic houses provide a wealth of roost opportunities. Loft spaces, wall cavities and gaps beneath hanging tiles. This roost entrance is just under the rafter
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

  Disused railway tunnels and derelict lime kilns, fortifications and ice houses are all valuable roost sites, particularly if the brickwork is in poor condition
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
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Old or partly decayed trees are full of holes and cracks that provide excellent accommodation for bats. They will often roost underneath lifting bark
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 
 
   

Stately homes and architectural follies combine the roost potential of old domestic houses with nooks and crannies that could be purpose built for bats
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 
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