Gallery 1 - Some of the Bats living in Surrey

 
        Gallery 2 - Traditional Roosting Places
       
Gallery 3 - Artificial Roosting Places
        Gallery 4 - Surrey Bat Group at Work

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Warning: Gloves should always be worn when handling bats as, like any wild animal, they may bite if alarmed.

Click on thumbnails to enlarge picture

A '55' or soprano pipistrelle, Pipistrellus pygmaeus
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
A '45' or common pipistrelle, Pipistrellus pipistrellus
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
Brown long eared bats, Plecotus auritus, huddled together in a cottage roof
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
 
 

A torpid Daubenton's bat, Myotis daubentonii, attracts a covering of dew
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

Daubentons1.jpg (77095 bytes)
Natterer2.jpg (65984 bytes) A Natterer's bat, Myotis nattereri, tucked snugly into some crumbling brickwork
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
 
     
  A group of noctule bats, Nyctalus noctula, in a bat box hibernaculum
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

Noctule2.jpg (43400 bytes)
       
  A Leisler's bat, Nyctalus leisleri
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
 
     
  A newly ringed specimen of one of Britain's rarest bats, the barbastelle Barbastella barbastellus
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
BarMen12.jpg (60747 bytes)

Another very rare bat, the Bechstein's Myotis bechsteini
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 
  The whiskered, Brandt's and Alcathoe's bats are very hard
to distinguish during hibernation
Myotis mystacinus/brandti/
alcathoe
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
WhiskBrandts5.jpg (65532 bytes)
Serotine06.jpg (72034 bytes) A serotine bat Eptesicus serotinus trapped during one of our surveys
Photo: Surrey Bat Group
 
  Noctule bat
Photo: Surrey Bat Group

 

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